Author Topic: Teamwork: How much time are you there?  (Read 3559 times)

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Diarmuid

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Teamwork: How much time are you there?
« on: Oct 10, 2006, 02:21 pm »
Hiya,
I was just wondering on average you would normally spend working on a show??  More in terms of a percentage instead of hours, as in are you there for every set building session and anything related to the show, or just for the rehersals and performances. 
Basically, over the half-term at my school, I was planning on going up to london and also spending a couple of days in birmingham, (for a total of 5 days).  However I found out today, that a couple of other people on the tech crew (production manager, set designer)  were going to be spending the whole two weeks in the theatre building the set.  What I want to know, is if you were in my position, would you cancel you trip(s) and spend the time in the theatre, or just ignore the guys who are going to spend their time in the theatre and probably end up winding you up about it?

Thanks for your help

Diarmuid
« Last Edit: Feb 11, 2008, 12:57 pm by PSMKay »

smccain

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Re: How much time are you there?
« Reply #1 on: Oct 10, 2006, 03:07 pm »
I think that is going to vary depending on what school/theatre you are working with. I am a part of a smaller college theatre department, so I not only stage manage, but I do other things as well. I am the master carpenter for the theatre company, and I am at all of the work calls. But, I try to help out as much as possible because it helps me understand all the aspects of the production. I would suggest being at the building if you could because then you can understand what's going on as far as set construction.
Sean

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Re: How much time are you there?
« Reply #2 on: Oct 10, 2006, 04:04 pm »
It all depends on the show. If these people spending two weeks in the theatre building the set are the set construction/design team, then technically, you should not have to be there all the time. It would be more a matter of checking in with the head set designer every few days to make sure all is going well, if you could not make it to the theatre.

If it is a case of everyone chipping in to do things like set production, see if you can be there for the start and end dates and call the Set Designer in the middle of the period to make sure everything is going well - and make sure they know they can call you if they have problems - It removes a lot of the wind-up factor if they believe you are willing to be on call.

Never put your life entirely on hold for a show. If you do, you will loose your mind. You may have to make sacrifices, but you still need a break. Otherwise you will have a nervous breakdown.

centaura

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Re: How much time are you there?
« Reply #3 on: Oct 10, 2006, 05:01 pm »
It depends on the history of what the job roles are at your school.  At the university that I attended, there were mainstage shows - on which a stage manager would do nothing more than maybe stop in the shop on casual walk-throughs; and there was a black box theatre where nothing was built at all unless folks showed up and volunteered.

Do you know what the history of involvement at your school is?  If its a case of only needing to make yourself aware of progress and other notes, then I would think that your trips were okay, if its a case that they could use your help then I'd stay and help.

-Centaura

fuzzy_7

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Re: How much time are you there?
« Reply #4 on: Oct 10, 2006, 06:28 pm »
At my school, SM's and ASM's have to be at every production meeting, rehearsal, performance, and are suggested to work in the shop on set construction as much as possible to become familiar with the set and how far along work has come on the set.
Derek A. Fuzzell

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Re: How much time are you there?
« Reply #5 on: Oct 11, 2006, 12:13 am »
When I was in college, I worked in the scene shop for work study.  I had no requirement to be there as a stage manager.  The mainstage scene shop had a staff of 2 plus student help.  However, as someone else also said, we too had a black box.  In these cases, I was often painting for and propping my own shows.  It all varies based on level of production.

If it's just a show you're SMing, and its not listed in your responsibilites for whatever credits you're getting, I'd say go enjoy your vacation.  Check in, but don't feel guilty about not being there.

KC_SM_0807

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Re: How much time are you there?
« Reply #6 on: Oct 20, 2006, 07:44 am »
I think it varies depending on the show.

I usually have anywhere from 10-40 hours of rehearsal a week, and then I work on rehearsal reports and all SM stuff outside of the show.  Of course when Tech Week comes, it's possible to work 50+hours a week.  I just finished Cats where I worked approximately 45 hours for 10 weeks.  Now I'm starting a straight play which only rehearses 10 hours a week, 20 during tech week.  It all depends on the show.. and of course your dedication as well.  :D
"Perhaps, therefore, Stage Managers not only need to be calm and meticulous professionals who know their craft, but masochists who feel pride in rising above impossible odds."

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