Author Topic: Pre-strike  (Read 3606 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

AJo99

  • New to Town
  • **
  • Posts: 5
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Pre-strike
« on: May 01, 2007, 06:08 pm »
What do stage managers do during pre-strike, if anything?  A fellow stage manager at the school I go to asked the head of the theatre department but he didn't give her a straight answer.  The show I'm working on closes this Saturday night so I was hoping I could find out what I'm supposed to do before that time comes.  Thanks!! 

megf

  • Permanent Resident
  • *****
  • Posts: 283
    • View Profile
  • Affiliations: AEA
  • Current Gig: Former SM
  • Experience: Professional
Re: Pre-strike
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2007, 07:55 pm »
Bear in mind, this may have no relationship to your school's definitions - but at UCLA, pre-strike was basically what the cast and crew did to make the theater ready for the technicians to strike the following morning. All handprops, most of the costumes, and any soft goods went away in pre-strike; dressing rooms were cleared and cleaned; all personal business was cleared from wings and booth, and any rented large props/set pieces were collected in the shop to be picked up on the next business day.

It's worth going to your PM for clarification on this!

Meg

AJo99

  • New to Town
  • **
  • Posts: 5
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: Pre-strike
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2007, 10:57 pm »
Sadly, we don't have a PM.  But what you described is what usually goes on at pre-strike except the technicians come in for pre-strike as well as strike.  Also, the shop heads call the practicum students in to help with pre-strike and strike. 

KC_SM_0807

  • SM Expert
  • ****
  • Posts: 118
    • View Profile
    • http://
Re: Pre-strike
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2007, 10:36 am »
Usually what I do before the technicians come in to strike the set is to make sure that all props are picked up, all spike tape is removed from the floor/set, all set pieces that can be removed are taken off the set, and that everything is picked up and moved out of the way. I usually do several walk-throughs of the set and make sure that everything I can move and get out of the way is taken care of.  Obviously you can't do this until the show closes, but this is what I do before the technicians come in to actually take down the set.  At my company, we usually close a show on Sunday and take care of pre-striking after the show so that the technicians can come in on Monday and just take the set down.  If you go ahead and get the little stuff out of the way, the technicans or students or whoever can just come in and worry about the set.  It saves time because they aren't standing there waiting for you or someone else to get other stuff out of the way.   
"Perhaps, therefore, Stage Managers not only need to be calm and meticulous professionals who know their craft, but masochists who feel pride in rising above impossible odds."

Rhynn

  • Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 50
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
  • Experience: High School
Re: Pre-strike
« Reply #4 on: Nov 11, 2007, 10:46 pm »
If the TD is not there to supervise strike or pre-strike, then the SM should supervise. 

Make sure that the cast and crew knows that no one leaves until they are cleared by you.  Once they finish one job they are to report to you for another job.  Everyone strikes!--even complete clutzes can take off spike tape and hang costumes back on a rack.  I give a large grade for strike.  Anyone who leaves early or doesn't work gets docked.  People who flake will fail.

I start by making a list of everything that needs to be done.  Then I sort it in the order of the way things should be done. 

I try to get my crews to take care of things that can be done during the run of the last show--hang costumes back up on the rack in the inventory order, put props back in the props boxes when they are no longer needed, clean up and store the make-up kits, etc.  I verify with my crew members that this is what will happen, or their strike grades will suffer.

I assign my crew to the stuff that happens immediately after last curtain while the cast is greeting the audience and getting out of costume.  Then I assign the cast in groups--usually separating close friends so more work gets done faster. 

My next set of duties are things that can be done after the first set of things.  I assign these jobs as company members report for their next duties until strike is done.

I try to position myself in a central location where I can supervise the work in the dressing rooms and onstage by transitioning only a few steps.

If you rehearse in your own space, double-check that every item is returned to its proper place and not just thrown around.  If you are in a rental space, check every single area to make sure that you don't leave anything by accident.  Don't forget the lobby display boards!
-----
I'm flattered, but the answer is still no.

LiLz

  • Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 80
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
    • Boundless Journey
  • Affiliations: AEA, USITT
Re: Pre-strike
« Reply #5 on: Nov 12, 2007, 06:29 am »
Be prepared ... make lists ... have cleaning stuff and garbage bags ... Think through the tools you'll need ... Make sure that, as people show up, you can assign them a task and keep them busy.  The minute people are allowed to let their focus and energy drop, the start drifting away from the work and can be difficult to get back on task.  Good luck - let us knkow how it goes!

Tags:
 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
5 Replies
13856 Views
Last post Aug 02, 2013, 04:35 pm
by loebtmc
0 Replies
2876 Views
Last post Sep 25, 2007, 08:59 am
by PSMKay
0 Replies
1038 Views
Last post Oct 03, 2013, 01:31 pm
by DeeCap