Author Topic: on the other end of the headset spectrum  (Read 16056 times)

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ERK

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« on: Dec 04, 2004, 09:58 am »
I know we've had a discussion about low-end headset solutions.  I am looking for the opposite; what do you think is the best headset out there?

Didaskalos

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #1 on: Dec 07, 2004, 11:34 pm »
wireless or cabled?
temporary or hard-wired?
Do it right the first time;  do it right every time.

ERK

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #2 on: Dec 08, 2004, 11:19 am »
cabled, temporary

centaura

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the lightweight ones!
« Reply #3 on: Dec 09, 2004, 10:29 pm »
The little light weight ones!  That can plug into whatever pack you have.  When I win the lottery and can afford to buy my own, I'm going to find out who makes those light weight ones and get one for myself!  I can't tell you how many headaches I get from those large, clunky headsets that grip you head and won't let go.  I can see them for backstage, where you're mobile and need to have something that holds on better, but for sitting and calling, the less my head feels like its going to cave in, the better.

-Centaura

dchec2100

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #4 on: Dec 10, 2004, 11:43 am »
[hyjack]

Does anyone know if it's possible to mix wired / wireless com systems together?  If so, anyone use a decent, yet affordable, wireless headset?

[/hyjack]

centaura

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wired & wireless
« Reply #5 on: Dec 10, 2004, 12:10 pm »
Yes, you can have wired headsets and wireless headsets on the same system.  A common set-up that I see is to have booth personel on wired, and backstage folks on wireless.  As for brands and pricing, that I can't tell you.  Never been on the buying end.

-Centaura

Erin_Candice

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #6 on: Dec 11, 2004, 12:44 am »
In order to have a wireless system in a space, you have to buy a wireless reciever, headsets, etc.  When my college did this it cost around $15,000 in 2001.  The only real requirement to combining wired and wireless is  that they must be the same manufactuer, mainly Clear Com or Telexx. I've used both and haven't noticed a difference.
 
There is a company that sells a system where for each of their wired headsets, you can run 2 wireless.  The wired packs plug into you existing ststem and you can get started for about $100.  I forget who that company is at the moment, but I think there is a link on this site.

Some people use walkie-talkies as an inexpensive and transportable alternative to intercom systems.  They are much cheeper and you can get a headset attachment to avoid the whole theater hearing all communications. Personally, I don't like this option.  Only one person can be talking at a time, so no one can respond to you until you stop pressing the talk button.  Also, they pick up a lot of other signals- like those walkie-talkie cell phones that are so popular.
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Stage_Ogre

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Wireless systems
« Reply #7 on: Dec 11, 2004, 10:37 am »
I purchased a Clear Com two channel wireless system last spring with all the required parts to connect to our wired system for around $8K.  You can get more expensive if you add the multi channel monitoring for the headsets and some other bells and whistles.  

In a show over the summer the tour came through with a Telex system and it was identical in every way even down to the receiver front panel color to our Clear Com unit.  Bottom line; buy whichever one is cheaper because it’s likely the exact same unit with a different label on it. Both companies have reasonable websites with unit details.

Both Clear Com and Telex make a lightweight headset and they come in single and double muff (earpiece) units. I’ve found the Clear Com to be lighter but less robust in terms of ability to sustain damage than the Telex.  My replacements will be Telex. I’ve found them light enough and the single muff units to be open enough to use even when working live sound.

guilkey

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #8 on: Dec 22, 2004, 10:30 pm »
IF your looking for good wireless sets I would look into clearcoms.
Plug it in and see if it blows.

avkid

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #9 on: Dec 30, 2004, 12:01 pm »
when using walkie talkies always use subcodes to avoid picking up random transmissions
Philip LaDue
Shore Production Group LLC
IATSE Local #21 Newark, NJ

loebtmc

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #10 on: Dec 30, 2004, 05:38 pm »
Quote
when using walkie talkies always use subcodes to avoid picking up random transmissions


ok - HOW -

Frog

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #11 on: Dec 31, 2004, 02:05 am »
When I'm calling a show, I found that I also don't like the large clunky ones....they're fine for backstage (as was said above), but what I found works nicely is a little headset that you see telemarketers, receptionists, switchboard operators, etc. wearing.  They're small, compact, and thin, and the mic is really thin, as opposed to the beastly larger ones.

isha

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #12 on: Mar 23, 2005, 01:28 pm »
what if you want all wireless? Is that bad? I've never seen much point in the ones that hook you to a certain spot.

I like the ones our highschool has, but they are starting to break, so I think we'll be getting new ones next year.

They have the headset connected to a small box (which attaches to your pant pocket) and you press the red button whenever you need to talk. The only problem is that:

1-they are breaking

2-if you are standing at a certain point in the theater behind a cement wall they don't work

3-we only have 3 of them, one for stage manager, one for the light booth (spot and board controller have to share), and one for the director(who usually is running around doing Techie work (because he can't stand to sit and watch the show..he has to be involved)
~isha

FallenRain

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #13 on: Mar 23, 2005, 09:04 pm »
Quote from: "isha"
what if you want all wireless? Is that bad? I've never seen much point in the ones that hook you to a certain spot.


Wireless headsets are certainly the ideal.  I work at a theatre that has wireless headsets on its older stage and yet the brand spanking new theatre they just opened 2 seasons ago was built with hard wired headsets.  Budget reasons I know, but boy does it make life on that deck difficult!  You either stay on headset as much as possible and trip everyone with the cord running 20 feet behind you or you leave headset anytime you have to walk somewhere...  sometimes it's a very tough choice.

centaura

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cost
« Reply #14 on: Mar 24, 2005, 01:50 am »
Quote
  what if you want all wireless? Is that bad? I've never seen much point in the ones that hook you to a certain spot.


The theory behind it is that, in theatres where there are crew who only sit at a board and don't need to get up and move during the show, they don't need a wireless.  Wireless tend to be more expensive, sometimes less reliable, and often losable in a big theatre.  A lot of spaces that I see on tour actually have the booths' headsets wired to the wall, that way they are always there and they can't walk off like a wireless.

But mainly its a budget thing.  Put the extra money into the wireless where you really need it [backstage/fly rail/etc.] and save money by putting wired in places where theory says they don't need it.

-Centaura

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