Author Topic: Costumes and Wardrobe  (Read 21160 times)

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PSMKay

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Costumes and Wardrobe
« on: Jun 16, 2006, 10:31 pm »
Laundry in/out checklist in excel format.

Maribeth

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Re: Costumes and Wardrobe
« Reply #1 on: Jul 01, 2006, 12:14 am »
Fitting schedule, in Word format.

gelo141

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Re: Costumes and Wardrobe
« Reply #2 on: Feb 07, 2010, 08:50 am »
My director is less than articulate about his vision for costumes for our productions, so this is the form that I created to force him to describe what he thought the characters should look like.  It's worked pretty well.
« Last Edit: Feb 15, 2010, 08:21 am by gelo »
There is really nothing you must be. & there is nothing you must do. There is really nothing you must have. & there is nothing you must know. There is really nothing you must become. However it helps to understand that fire burns, & when it rains . . .

gelo141

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Re: Costumes and Wardrobe
« Reply #3 on: Feb 15, 2010, 08:17 am »
In the school that I work at the students supply a lot of the costumes, I'm sure that it is the same with alot of amature productions.  Mail merge is such a useful tool.  I take my costume plot (created in Excel) and merge it into a Word or Publisher document and create sheets to let the actors know what they need to supply.  I've attached a sample (as a PDF) of the Publisher file that I'm using for this year's production of Annie Jr.  If you want the publisher file, I can email it (its too big to fit here as an attachment).
There is really nothing you must be. & there is nothing you must do. There is really nothing you must have. & there is nothing you must know. There is really nothing you must become. However it helps to understand that fire burns, & when it rains . . .

gelo141

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Re: Costumes and Wardrobe
« Reply #4 on: Jul 01, 2011, 05:28 pm »
Always looking for things to make my job easier, and i found this in an old costume designers textbook that I was reading the other day.  Could be supremely usefull if you're not the costume person but need to do the shopping for that person.
There is really nothing you must be. & there is nothing you must do. There is really nothing you must have. & there is nothing you must know. There is really nothing you must become. However it helps to understand that fire burns, & when it rains . . .

ewharton

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Re: Costumes and Wardrobe
« Reply #5 on: Oct 06, 2011, 12:43 am »
This is the wardrobe run sheet I created for a production of Alfred Hitchcock's The 39 Steps. I like it because it includes both quick changes and non-quick changes (QC are marked in bold) and anything else Wardrobe might be doing. (For example, in our production, Wardrobe occasionally lit an actor's exit because Stage Management couldn't be there).

catalinacisne

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Quick Change Plot
« Reply #6 on: Oct 07, 2011, 08:35 am »
Attached is the QC Plot I made for a production of Charlotte's Web. Information includes what page the change occurs on (you can also add timestamps), who the actor is, where they exit before the change, where the change takes place, what they are changing out of, what they are changing into, where they enter after the change is complete, and what the change consists of. To make this form, you need a complete Entrance/Exit plot (or the blocking script), and a piece list from the costume designer.

I learned the basic format (modified since) working as an Intern at the Children's Theater Company in Minneapolis; this plot is not from a show done at that theatre.