Author Topic: How do you mark your script during rehearsals?  (Read 5271 times)

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Chelley

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How do you mark your script during rehearsals?
« on: Apr 16, 2008, 04:40 pm »
Hello, I am a newbie to stage management and I will on my first paid gig over the summer! YAY! But I am stressing out...I have shadowed stage managers as an intern and called out cues but never had an opportunity to mark up a script during rehearsals or productions.  :o Any suggestions or ideas as to how I can learn to mark up my script that is easy and "idiot" proof??? ??? What do I highlight or mark or write down priority-wise. HELP!   :-\

ewharton

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Re: How do you mark your script during rehearsals?
« Reply #1 on: Apr 16, 2008, 09:20 pm »
First - congratulations on your first paying gig.

The second thing I would say is never highlight. Always work in pencil - things change all the time.

I like to write down all blocking, esp. when the director says something very specific (ie. make sure you're at the door by this line, or look at so and so for this line, etc).

I also track props (where they come from, who uses them, where they end up, etc.). I also do the same thing for costumes, esp. if there are costume changes on stage.

And then the big ones, lights and sound cues (and any other types of cues the show may have). Sometimes sound cues are obvious where they will be (ie. the doorbell rings). Before you start tech speak to the sound and lighting designer and see if they have a prel. cue list that you can start to put in your book. And then expect to add more cues during tech.

Good luck on your job

ddsherrer

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Re: How do you mark your script during rehearsals?
« Reply #2 on: Apr 16, 2008, 09:36 pm »
I think that there is already a lot of info for you here.  Try searching things like "prompt book" and check the Forms page.
Hope this helps.
~Deb
If all the world's a stage, where's my stage manager?

Airborne800

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Re: How do you mark your script during rehearsals?
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2008, 04:57 pm »
I've found blocking is easier to keep track of if I have the script on the right, and on the back of the previous page to the left, have a blown-up copy of the ground plan attached. This works best if the set is more or less the same thru-out the show. This way, you can draw X's to represent the actors (or whatever works best for you) and draw arrows to wherever they cross. Write details on the script, but using the groundplan saves a lot of time and effort. It's easier to redraw an arrow than to rewrite a few sentences. Also, using shorthand and abbreviations helps, as long as others can understand it. Instead of writing "Henry the Vth" every time, write "H5" or whatever.

And I agree that a pencil is the best utensil in the world for a stage manager. I never permanently mark anything, because you never know when a director will change their mind.

I hope this helps!

avkid

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Re: How do you mark your script during rehearsals?
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2008, 06:07 pm »
I hid every pen I could find in the theatre.
 ;D

(stay out of the back of the first drawer)
Philip LaDue
Shore Production Group LLC
IATSE Local #21 Newark, NJ

captaincutlawn

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Re: How do you mark your script during rehearsals?
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2008, 08:03 pm »
I've found that the best way to mark your script depends on what type of show you do.
 My best advice is to use those colored dots that people use at garage sales. They really come in handy with a director who can't decide where he wants a cue

 

riotous