Author Topic: Fitting Marley to different stages on tour  (Read 4346 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

EzBrEzPSM

  • New to Town
  • **
  • Posts: 12
    • View Profile
  • Experience: Professional
Fitting Marley to different stages on tour
« on: Jan 21, 2013, 04:28 pm »
I'm new to the site and haven't been able to find a discussion that can help me with this question. If there is an existing similar topic that I've missed, please copy the link for me and I thank you ahead of time. Otherwise, here goes my question...

I was recently hired on as the production/company/stage manager for an up and coming professional dance company, after PSMing their Nutcracker production in December. We have a few tour dates coming up in the next couple of months and we will be traveling with some lighting equipment and the Ballet Company's Marley dance floor. Obviously, the venues we will be performing at will have different stage dimensions and most of them do not have their own Marley in house. My question is; when left with no other option (the dancers must perform on Marley), what are some tricks of the trade to fit a Marley dance floor to a stage that has completely different dimensions. I'm still waiting on the venue TDs to get back with me about their exact stage dimensions, but I know for the most part our Marley will be too long and we might run into the situation where we will have too much width US and have to leave a roll out and loose valuable dancing space. In these instances, what is the safest route to take to try to keep things running smoothly without endangering the well being of the dancers? Iíve seen people roll the edges of the dance floor up and tape them down, but this seems like it would be horrible for the Marley and very unsafe for the dancers. All input is appreciated, Thanks!

KMC

  • Forum Moderators
  • *****
  • Posts: 962
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Current Gig: Project Manager, Systems Integration
  • Experience: Former SM
Re: Fitting Marley to different stages on tour
« Reply #1 on: Jan 21, 2013, 04:40 pm »
Hi EzBrEzPSM, and welcome to SMNetwork.  Thanks for checking elsewhere prior to posting your question, the staff and frequent posters will certainly appreciate that  :)

I think step one really is getting the dimensions from the house TDs.  Make sure you get drawings, not just numbers. 

If possible, do any of your overlapping/cutting/etc... in areas where there is less choreography, and definitely get the input of the choreographer, look at the drawings of different venues together, etc... 

What is the actual dance surface you have?  "Marley" is a bit of a misnomer as it was a floor manufacturer, not a type of flooring, similar to calling a tissue a Kleenex (as an aside Marley Floors Ltd hasn't made the stuff since the 1970s).  If you can find out the manufacturer and type of floor, e.g. Harlequin Reversible, then you can research the manufacturer's recommended care instructions in terms of what will damage the floor. 
Get action. Do things; be sane; donít fritter away your time; create, act, take a place wherever you are and be somebody; get action. -T. Roosevelt

iamchristuffin

  • Permanent Resident
  • *****
  • Posts: 270
    • View Profile
    • www.christuffin.co.uk
  • Affiliations: UK SMA, UK Equity
  • Experience: Professional
Re: Fitting Marley to different stages on tour
« Reply #2 on: Jan 21, 2013, 05:40 pm »
I'm currently doing exactly the same thing here in the UK, with Harlequin 3mm floor. The best way we've found is to have the floor running US/DS, rather than SL/SR - we then keep the excess floor on the roll and hide it upstage of the cyc. We use the back of the prosc as our setting line, and start laying out from centre. This means that a) we can have excess in the wings, b) the marks are all in the right place, with the same relationships to each other, and c) any excess floor is hidden from view.

As we're near the start of our tour, we're doing a run of one of the pieces in each venue, but when we get further in, having class onstage, and allowing the dancers to work steps out themselves will be sufficient!

Hope this helps with your problem.

C

EzBrEzPSM

  • New to Town
  • **
  • Posts: 12
    • View Profile
  • Experience: Professional
Re: Fitting Marley to different stages on tour
« Reply #3 on: Jan 22, 2013, 10:48 am »
Thanks for sharing! These were very helpful responses. Much appreciated!

Jessie_K

  • Superstar!
  • *****
  • Posts: 528
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
    • International Stage Manager of Mystery
  • Affiliations: AEA, AGMA, SMA (on leave)
  • Current Gig: Queen of the Night
  • Experience: Professional
Re: Fitting Marley to different stages on tour
« Reply #4 on: Jan 22, 2013, 11:59 am »
I have in dire circumstances had to fold excess marley underneath and tape it all down.  It presents a tripping hazard is not good for the floor.  Sometimes, there is no choice.  You can also overlap pieces if necessary to avoid shrinking your size too much.  4 and 1/2 pieces is often better than 4.

The thinner your floor the easier both of these options are.

Be sure to point out any hazards (folding, overlap) to your dancers.

ambrosialx

  • Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 77
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
    • Ambrosia LX and Design Portfolio
  • Affiliations: University of Guelph
  • Current Gig: Production Manager- Roseneath Theatre
  • Experience: Professional
Re: Fitting Marley to different stages on tour
« Reply #5 on: Mar 19, 2013, 09:14 pm »
That is exactly what I do. I highly recommend this because it also helps with spacing for the dancers just make sure you are dead on your centre line! Also if you label which pieces go where occasionally you can keep spikes on the floor with minimal moving.

I'm currently doing exactly the same thing here in the UK, with Harlequin 3mm floor. The best way we've found is to have the floor running US/DS, rather than SL/SR - we then keep the excess floor on the roll and hide it upstage of the cyc. We use the back of the prosc as our setting line, and start laying out from centre. This means that a) we can have excess in the wings, b) the marks are all in the right place, with the same relationships to each other, and c) any excess floor is hidden from view.

As we're near the start of our tour, we're doing a run of one of the pieces in each venue, but when we get further in, having class onstage, and allowing the dancers to work steps out themselves will be sufficient!

Hope this helps with your problem.

C
"I will prepare and someday my chance will come"