Author Topic: Written test for employment  (Read 2992 times)

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Chelley

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Written test for employment
« on: Jun 09, 2008, 06:40 pm »
I applied for a Lead Event Tech position at a local community college here in Los Angeles. The position would run all the shows for their brand new 40-million dollar, 499-seat theatre to open Mid-September AND organizing the campus events. Needless to say, I was very excited when I got an email to take a written test which counts for 50% of the hiring decision, the other 50% will be based on the interview. This position fits my skill-set perfectly since I have had extensive event planning experience as well as stage and production management.  :-\

The description of the test was very vague. The tell me that I will be tested on sound, AV, lighting and management...but no specifics if it will be multiple choice, essay or a computerized testing...etc. I was told to allot at least 2 hours including the instructional period...AAAH! :o I would not have to do all of the above, but I will need to manage the teams.

I am sooo nervous...I hate taking written tests, that is why I became a stage manager so I would not have to take any tests! In my opinion our job cannot really be "tested"...it is all trial by fire and experience.  If any of you have any idea what I should be reviewing or any clue what a test like this would entail and what I should focus on...I could use the help. Any advice or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!  ???

smalltimeSM

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Re: Written test for employment
« Reply #1 on: Jun 09, 2008, 09:50 pm »
if you know any specifics of the venue, i.e. what lighting gear they have, fly system, ect.. I would review the basics of those items.  As well as, what each position does.  i.e. what a M. E. does or a sound engineer.  (there is a difference from sound engineer to sound designer)

Break-A-Leg with the test and Interview.  (if you have specific Q's on M.E./ flying systems please feel free to message)

hbelden

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Re: Written test for employment
« Reply #2 on: Jun 10, 2008, 02:50 pm »
In my limited experience, theatres connected to state-run schools come up with amazing hoops to jump through in their hiring process.  Most of it is behind the scenes for the applicant, and just a bunch of paperwork that the person doing the hiring makes their assistant do.  It's because the people responsible for making sure theatre hires are quality, don't have any notion of what we do.  If you know your job, any written test they give you ought to be a piece of cake no matter what format it's in, because the people writing the test don't have the skill set to do our jobs.

Don't sweat the test too much; it won't be an SAT. It probably won't be incredibly detailed.  I agree with smalltimeSM, check their inventory of equipment beforehand and brush up on any pieces that are unfamiliar to you (short of reading the owner's manual from front to back cover - just know what the capabilities of the boards are, etc.). 

I would suggest (because of the state-run school aspect) that you concentrate your preparation on SAFETY.  Review what you know of fire exits, earthquake procedures, OSHA rules, etc.

Good luck!
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Heath Belden

"I'm not good, I'm not nice, I'm just right." - Sondheim
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