Author Topic: Rehearsal Reports  (Read 1408 times)

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mandalinmarcell

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Rehearsal Reports
« on: Jun 18, 2017, 12:04 pm »
So I just have a question about rehearsal reports here is some background: I am a high schooler and for each production work with a lot of people so I've gotten into routine of using google docs for things such as attendance, schedule, to-do lists, and a master list of props, set, lights, sound, costumes, and other various things of the sort. These are all shared documents with those that need them so because this is the case do you think it sounds like I would still need to do rehearsal reports?

Maribeth

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Re: Rehearsal Reports
« Reply #1 on: Jun 19, 2017, 05:14 am »
A report is a summary of what happened in rehearsal that day- it allows people to see at-a-glance what happened and what new information came out of that rehearsal. It will help keep everyone on the same page- the lighting designer can see that you made major changes to the sound in a scene, and helps inform their lighting choices. (If you added 3 instances of thunder on page 34, perhaps they might want to add a lightning cue, etc).

One of the benefits of sending a report is that you are "pushing" the information in it to the other people involved, rather than waiting for them to "pull" the information themselves from a document stored in the cloud. Time-sensitive information can get missed easily, as someone can just say "Oh, I didn't see the design run on the schedule for tomorrow." or "I didn't realize you needed those props, I haven't looked at the prop list in a few days." Pushing the information to them forces people to look at it, and highlights the info that you need them to see.

Reports also document what happened in rehearsal that day and can be referred to at a later point if needed, like in the case of an actor injury. It's extremely helpful to have a quick note of "Susie twisted her ankle while rehearsing choreography. She was given ice but declined any other medical attention. An injury report has been filled out and left in _____'s mailbox."

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BilOregon

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Re: Rehearsal Reports
« Reply #2 on: Jun 19, 2017, 02:28 pm »
I agree with what Maribeth has said.  Just one small thing to add is if you email it to them (not just share it) they can't come back and say, "You never told me!"

I do my rehearsal reports on Google Docs but I then save it as a PDF and email it to everyone.  It takes me an extra couple of minutes but then I know everyone has it and it is now their choice if they read it or not.  If they say they didn't know, I tell them the exact date I sent it and then resend it to them. 

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Bil

mandalinmarcell

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Re: Rehearsal Reports
« Reply #3 on: Jun 20, 2017, 06:27 pm »
Thank you for your response, but I'm still wondering what if it feels as though there is not much to report for that day in rehearsal, especially like in the beginning of the process?

BayAreaSM

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Re: Rehearsal Reports
« Reply #4 on: Jun 21, 2017, 02:29 am »
It's still necessary to have the record. At least for the AEA work I've done over the last "X" number of years, a daily rehearsal report is expected.

Even if you feel nothing eventful happened, you still note the hours of the rehearsal, any absences, any tardies, and what was worked. Sometimes a director may turn to you and ask "when did we last work on scene 3?" and if you have your reports, you can tell them. Also - sending this record of what happened during the rehearsal can tell how long certain scenes are taking, which can help get you support if blocking/etc is taking too long to accomplish and you're running out of rehearsal time before tech. Granted, this may not help at the high school level - but it will in the future. Also, it will help you understand how fast this director works - and help you gauge timings for upcoming rehearsals.

Maribeth

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Re: Rehearsal Reports
« Reply #5 on: Jun 21, 2017, 06:24 pm »
Thank you for your response, but I'm still wondering what if it feels as though there is not much to report for that day in rehearsal, especially like in the beginning of the process?

That just means a quick and easy report that day! :)

AndyS

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Re: Rehearsal Reports
« Reply #6 on: Feb 04, 2018, 05:28 am »
A report of "no news" also positively lets your designers know that they can continue working without any alterations to the plan, they don't have to worry that they missed something or are out of the loop. Makes for less miscommunication and confusion.

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