Author Topic: Kit Container  (Read 17002 times)

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shatbox

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Kit Container
« on: Jan 18, 2006, 03:25 pm »
1. What sort of container do you use (roadcase, luggage,etc) for your kit?

2. Do you travel with your kit or do you assemble a kit at your destination?

What do you like or dislike about the one you have? Do you have a dream case? What tips do you have to offer for someone looking to replace a tired old suitcase or building a kit for the first time?
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Mac Calder

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Kit Container
« Reply #1 on: Jan 18, 2006, 06:15 pm »
Me, I use the mother of all roadcases. It's lid (which is actally on the front) comes off and clips onto the side, with fold down legs to become a table, whilst my kit is in draws within the case. It is a very expensive kit. I am also looking into getting a scrapbooking 'tote' on wheels, but they are damn expensive.

Since I have soo much room, I have everything but the kitchen sink in my roadcase, and it would be hell on earth to dissassemble. I do however tailor it to a certain extent, or rather, cause it to evolve.

Dislikes about it - I need to use a van to move it. And it is encumbersom if we go between many rehearsal rooms or it cannot be left there. That is why I am considering making a second. The main advantage of mine is I set it up as a desk during bump in with plans and schedules on it and have tools and tape in the top draw. It is more of a portable workstation than a kit though.

If I was to set up a kit (as I am planning on doing) I would buy something like This

kjdiehl

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Kit Container
« Reply #2 on: Jan 19, 2006, 11:06 pm »
Actually, I've used the same 2-tray fishing tackle box for my entire 10-yr career. It's served me well. I change what I put in it sometimes, but it mostly stays the same. But I've really been getting into reducing lately, and i recently bought a like $3 little nylon zipper bag that mounts in the front of a 3-ring binder. I put a few of my favorite pencils, eraser, a couple pens, hole-reinforcers, post-its and little sticky cue-flags in it. Maybe a couple binder clips. And that's all I have with me personally on tour right now. yeah, I have bigger and more show supplies in my roadbox and hamper, but that's the extent of what I take personally. It works.
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Cat

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Kit Container
« Reply #3 on: Feb 28, 2006, 12:06 am »
I started out with a tackel box and it grew into the rolling tool box.  I use a rolling tool box that I got at Walmart.  The top half locks and detaches from the bottom so that it is easy to move.  I keep my headset it the top and all of my pain meds and such locked up.  It is great because it has spots for paper clips, eyedrops, batteries, ect.  I LOVE IT.

The best advice that I could give is "Be Prepared For ANYTHING!!!"
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erin

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Kit Container
« Reply #4 on: Mar 02, 2006, 04:12 am »
I'm a bit of a packrat and have an assortment of storage bins left over from when i did more 1099 work.  Now that i'm at an institution which provides all the basics (pencils, highlighters, holepunchoers, staplers, tape, paper clips...all that office supply stuff) am trying to pare down a little....

Currently down to one enormous wheeled tacklebox (can't seem to find a photo online...must not be in production anymore, Plano brand) with a roomy tool storage area at the bottom, an insert tool tray, an upper compartment that locks onto the bottom with 4 transparent tackle organizers, removable top and front comparments.   It fits in the back seat of my car (behind the passenger seat, if it's pulled all the way forward) and can be unstacked to fit in the trunk.  At one point there was a side attachment for holding fishing poles but that broke off quickly.

Tackle boxes are the best, with nearly infinite organizational compartments  .You can customize tool boxes with smaller tackle boxes, they come in many sizes.

Avoid the fold out trays
(http://www.planomolding.com/content/index.cfm?siteaction=product&lineid=4&groupid=11&sectionid=36&partid=197)
They break easily.

One of my collegues has:
http://www.planomolding.com/content/index.cfm?siteaction=product&lineid=2&groupid=16&sectionid=54&partid=70
Also wheeled for easy mobility.  The removable trays are handy.

erin

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Kit Container
« Reply #5 on: Mar 02, 2006, 05:00 pm »
Quote from: "erin"
Currently down to one enormous wheeled tacklebox (can't seem to find a photo online...


Ah, found it:
http://www.thg.ru/howto/20020820/print.html

megf

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Kit Container
« Reply #6 on: Mar 02, 2006, 11:17 pm »
This is more an office kit than an "anything" kit, but then, I tend to work in places that have shops (or carpenter types, at any rate) around:

http://www.michaels.com/art/online/displayProductPage?productNum=sb0006

I like that it can be modified, too....

Didaskalos

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Kit Container
« Reply #7 on: Mar 12, 2006, 09:52 pm »
I have an old Techni-Tool hard-shell rolling case.  Extremely sturdy.  Key and combo locks.  I took out the tool pallets and filled 'er up.  I set my tool box on top of it, strap it to the telescoping handle with a bungee cord, and away we go.  If I need my tools, then they are separate from the rest and ready to take on site or throw in the back of the car.  I can also put something else on top of the tool box if need be, which usually means I can get everything in one trip.  I found a few sites that sell similar types of cases.  Lots of great options...

Chicago Case Company - Tool Cases
Chicago Case manufactures a wide variety of tool cases. We offer a selection of tool pallets to fit many types of applications. Some cases even feature winged pallets.
www.chicagocase.com

Waterproof, Unbreakable Tool Cases
Waterproof tool cases that are airtight, unbreakable and submersible. Manufactured from space age plastic they are ideal for the demands of tool storage.
www.seahorse.net

Tool Cases - Large Selection in Stock
Case Club has a large stock selection of tool cases, with or with out wheels, aluminum, watertight, heavy duty, airline approved, economical, stock or custom at competitive prices.
www.caseclub.com

Buy Tool Cases and Tool Kits
Since 1980, R & K Supply Company has been providing quality tools and tool kits at competitive prices. Visit today and view our entire catalogue, including zipper kits, cases, and more.
www.toolkitpeople.com

Tool Cases - Order Online
Tool cases for many uses available for online ordering from New World Case, Inc. Free UPS ground shipping available today.
www.customcases.com

Pelican Products. US
Tool cases - we have all standard pelican cases and lights in stock and ready to ship, including the protector cases.
www.pelicanproducts.us

Quality Tool Cases at Great Prices
Full line of quality tool cases and zipper cases from names you can trust, including Crawford and Platt.
www.crawfordtool.com

Tecra Tools - The Tool Kit Specialists
Huge selection of tool kits and tool cases for field service, network and LAN installers, computer repair, telecom repair, plant maintenance and fiber optics.
www.tecratools.com

Tool Cases - Discount Prices
Free shipping on tool cases. Huge selection and great prices.
www.casesandmore.com
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ljh007

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Re: Kit Container
« Reply #8 on: Jun 17, 2006, 12:11 am »
I just carry all my stuff in a 3-level tackle box. It's simple, it's not too darn heavy, and it has lovely little compartments for everything. Nothing fancy, but it works for me! (I usually use company-provided bins/cases to hold larger things like spike/gaff tape, tools and hardware, paper towels, etc etc. My kit is just all the nice stuff I like to have with me.)

Tigerrr

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Re: Kit Container
« Reply #9 on: Jun 19, 2006, 07:22 am »
I have often found myself rehearsing shows in several locations, so I've had to make sure my kit never gets bigger than I can carry on the bus.  Believe me, it's forced me to bring only the ESSENTIALS to rehearsals!  In those situations, I don't feel too bad if someone asks for something relatively obscure because generally everyone understands that I'm not a packhorse.  For instance, instead of a box of bandaids, I'll have half a dozen in a ziplock.  Instead of 5 rolls of spike tape, I'll take one or two.  And if you're using many rooms, there's no point in taping out the floor and you usually can't.  I'll take the relative positions of set pieces and spike those out.  On the plus side, in these situations I've never found occasion to use tools.  Sure, I'll have my leatherman, but that's about it.  So I don't need to carry around a lot of the heavy stuff.  I own almost everything in miniature and only take a handful of any one thing at a time. Heck, even the mini sharpies can save a lot of space! 

There are little things you can do to help lighten the load too.  Why take 50 pencils if you have a cast of 6?  Why a giant box of kleenex when a smaller, square box will do nicely?  Another thing I do is take items out of their packages and put them in ziplocks if necessary.  The packaging can take up a lot of room - sometimes being larger than the item itself!

During prep week, I'll try to find a cupboard/store room (a secure one!) that I can use to house larger stuff that I'm probably not going to need on a regular basis.  Making friends with the janitorial and maintenance staff is always a good thing.  And when we move into the theatre, I certainly make a special trip with a friend with a car to get all my gear down there.

I also change the contents of my kit slightly with every show.  If we're going to have wardrobe items in rehearsal, I'll take my sewing kit, but if not, I won't.  Not that a sewing kit might not come in handy, but I can play the "I might need it so I'll bring it" game until the cows come home and my back is broken.

Yeah, not having a car can be a real pain, but look on the bright side: at least I don't have to lift weights to get my exercise!  ;D

shatbox

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Re: Kit Container
« Reply #10 on: Jun 21, 2006, 06:10 pm »
Often I don't feel like dragging everything around with me, but i just can't help but take everything with me. It's nice to know that people operate without having to haul around everything. I think I will try to downsize what I carry, the flip side is people will depend on me less to provide all the things they say they need but can pick up after rehearsal.
« Last Edit: Jun 21, 2006, 06:13 pm by shatbox »
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Lady

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Re: Kit Container
« Reply #11 on: Jul 05, 2006, 11:21 pm »
My first kit in high school was in a plastic lunch box.  Over the years I've graduated to small tool boxes, a backpack, and now a $20.00 artist's bin that I got at the campus bookstore a few years ago.  I actually prefer a smaller kit since I'm never sure if I'll have the cash to make a new box everywhere I go (fresh out of college = no $$$).  Besides, a good sized SM box comes in handy when you live in the dorms.  :)
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stella4starr

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Re: Kit Container
« Reply #12 on: Jul 06, 2006, 01:14 am »
i'm all about the tackle box; it's perfect.
the little compartments are fantastic.
 :)

jenhen

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Re: Kit Container
« Reply #13 on: Jul 06, 2006, 07:42 am »
I've got a medium-sized tool box kit that I keep backstage with things like batteries, tape, safety pins, first-aid, etc. But I also have a Sterilite tub full of office supplies for those times when I'm working in a space where there's no office.  I split into two parts to lighten the load.

I also just found an awesome backpack from Swiss Army.  It has room for my laptop (14" powerbook) and a 5" binder.  Plus it's got padded straps and back so you can acutually load it full of stuff and then carry it comfortably.

centaura

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Re: Kit Container
« Reply #14 on: Jul 06, 2006, 06:58 pm »
I have always loved Lands End's softsided briefcase - its made of a very sturdy canvas and has a shoulder strap.  For tour it was great, as I could keep my prompt book in it as well as all my other kit stuff, and with the shoulder strap it was easy to carry around.  Before everything was banned from airplanes, it was my carry on as it fit perfectly under the seat in front of me.    It has nice little interior pockets for pens, pencils and small things, a divider for books, and a big open area.  The only downside is the big open area can sometimes get clogged up with things, but I was so familiar with my 'black bag' that I could stick my hand in and get anything that I wanted. 

I could get 6 or more years of out of one, even with hard, physical abuse like banging around the back of a tour truck, being put on as checked-in luggage while flying (after the ban of anything metal being on planes - waaaay too many knives, tools, wrenches, etc.), being dragged from hotel to hotel, venue to venue.  I did some of the same things that someone earlier posted, I would take things out of packaging and put them in baggies for ease of sorting and stuffing my bag.

-Centaura

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