Author Topic: Who Locks Your Doors?  (Read 7954 times)

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Sarah

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Who Locks Your Doors?
« on: Jan 25, 2008, 08:24 pm »
This is a thought spawned by the "Cleaning the Greenroom" thread. Is the locking of exterior building or interior theatre doors considered building maintenance?

Who's responsible for keeping your theatre secure?

chops

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Re: Who Locks Your Doors?
« Reply #1 on: Jan 25, 2008, 10:28 pm »
In my current gig it is security.  In other theatres I have worked in I have seen; the house manager, technical director, theatre director and in two occasions the janitor responsible for making sure the building is secure. 

Although one thing that I have noticed is that it is important to make sure that whoever is in charge of making sure things are secure knows that that is their responsibility.  As for the last one out policy I have seen that one fail a couple of times. 
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wtcsrstaph4life

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Re: Who Locks Your Doors?
« Reply #2 on: Jan 25, 2008, 11:43 pm »
The last few shows I've worked on, it was stage managements job to lock the whole place up during rehearsals, and then once shows started the SMs took care of the back stage and House management took care of the lobby side.

zayit shachor

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Re: Who Locks Your Doors?
« Reply #3 on: Jan 26, 2008, 05:21 am »
I'm not sure what other contracts say, but in an SPT contract, SMs are specifically forbidden from opening or locking up the theater.

Granted, often it makes the most sense for the SM to do it anyway, since they are usually the first in and the last out, but it's food for thought.

ReyYaySM

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Re: Who Locks Your Doors?
« Reply #4 on: Jan 26, 2008, 12:29 pm »
At my current theatre, during rehearsal it is the responsibility of my ASM, who is an intern, to lock the rehearsal hall.  During performances, it is the responsibility of house management to lock front-of-house doors and for my ASM to lock the stage doors.  Arming the building's security system is the responsibility of the last person out, which is usually wardrobe (also an intern). 

jspeaker

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Re: Who Locks Your Doors?
« Reply #5 on: Jan 26, 2008, 01:38 pm »
Where I am now (and the last few theatre I have worked at) the doors lock automatically and everyone uses a fob or key card to get in.
Jess W. Speaker, III
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Sarah

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Re: Who Locks Your Doors?
« Reply #6 on: Jan 26, 2008, 05:29 pm »
Quote
Where I am now (and the last few theatre I have worked at) the doors lock automatically and everyone uses a fob or key card to get in.

The best of all possible worlds...

jspeaker

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Re: Who Locks Your Doors?
« Reply #7 on: Jan 26, 2008, 11:01 pm »
Quote
Where I am now (and the last few theatre I have worked at) the doors lock automatically and everyone uses a fob or key card to get in.

The best of all possible worlds...

AMEN!!
Jess W. Speaker, III
Equity Stage Manager
DC Area AEA Liaison
(301) 335-1498
 
http://q5go.blogspot.com/

Rebbe

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Re: Who Locks Your Doors?
« Reply #8 on: Jan 30, 2008, 12:34 pm »
I'm not sure what other contracts say, but in an SPT contract, SMs are specifically forbidden from opening or locking up the theater.
Granted, often it makes the most sense for the SM to do it anyway, since they are usually the first in and the last out, but it's food for thought.

The SPT rule is phrased in a pretty hard core way, but there are still loopholes.  At one of the theaters I work at, SMs help with security.  The last person out of the building (which includes offices and rehearsal rooms, not just the stage) walks through it to see that all lights are off and interior doors are locked, that sort of thing, then sets the security alarm on their way out.  However, the SM is never responsible for opening or locking the exterior doors to the building.  The doors are automatically locked and staff use a code to get in.  They are magically unlocked for patrons for the few hours just before, during, and after a performance (I don’t know if House Management does this, or if they’re on some kind of timer). 

I think this is a reasonable arrangement, since I can come and go at anytime, and the book does not talk about lights and security alarms and non-theater doors. I could choose not to unlock the theater itself, and instead take the long way around to backstage or the booth, or ask someone else to unlock that one door for me, but that just seems silly since we all have the same key and I'm standing right there.  I also like to think this rule is in part designed to protect SMs from being responsible for patron access to the building/house, and the SMs in this situation have nothing to do with that.
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Oobleck1441

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Re: Who Locks Your Doors?
« Reply #9 on: Jan 31, 2008, 11:08 pm »
This has nothing to do with everyone conversation really..
For school, I'm considered and SIC (Student in Charge).
I've been told it is my responsiblilty to lock and unlock the theatre,
booth and all storage rooms. On top of that I am paid to do this,
even if I am not in there at all. So I sort of make out ethier way!
But this has nothing to do with the more perfessional people out there.

Scott (formerly Digga)

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Re: Who Locks Your Doors?
« Reply #10 on: Feb 01, 2008, 12:36 pm »
The rule lies in a lot of the AEA contracts and it's design is to protect Stage Management from being held responsible in case the building isn't locked at the end of the night and something happens.  It's a liability thing and AEA didn't want producers blaming their members for break-ins and lost equipment, etc.

However, this doesn't mean the SM can't carry a set of keys to get themselves in and out.  Where I am now, the PA and the lighting intern are responsible for locking down the whole building at the end of the night and unlocking it before a show.  I have a set of keys as well though on the off chance I get there really early or just need to get in.  I like it this way.  Gives me flexibility to come and go as needed but takes some of the responsibility off of my shoulders.

I have been in situations in NY where a producer wanted to give me the only set of keys and make me responsible for locking the building and the booth each night.  Being NYC and the fact that the producers were renting the space, I didn't want any part of it.  I told them they could give me a set of keys but I can't be held responsible for making sure the building and booth are locked.  This was not taken lightly by the producers, assistant production manager or by building management claiming they had never heard of that rule before and that other SMs had never had a problem with doing it.  I was given such an attitude by the APM that I almost felt the need to apologize until I thought it through and realized it's not my fault, they didn't read the rule book.  It didn't help that this company got caught breaking and bending quite a number of different rules under the LOA-NYC contract and they were already blaming me for that.

centaura

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Re: Who Locks Your Doors?
« Reply #11 on: Feb 01, 2008, 04:38 pm »
I'm in a wierd position, as the stage manager at a road house, my job is to be here for the tours for as long as they're in the building.  So I end up opening up and unalarming the building at the top of the day prior to their arrival, and am here until the last bus or truck leaves the dock at the end of the night.  I will lock the backstage door, but the cleaning company actually sets the alarm after they're done.

So, on one hand I exist for the tour, so it goes hand in hand that I'm the one opening up for them and locking after them.  In normal day to day operations, the first office worker arriving in the morning unalarms, though the doors stay locked.   Well, my doors stay lock, their doors up front get unlocked for the 8-5 business day.  The Box Office sets the alarm at the end of the day and locks their doors, since they're open an hour after the rest of our days' end.

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Re: Who Locks Your Doors?
« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2008, 09:38 pm »
The running SM is responsible for looking the stage door exit. Other doors are secured depending on department the door is closest to and the alarm is generally set by the closing kitchen staff though if I stay past them I will put in the code.
"It required a bland, conscientious temperament that expected abuse and never admiration. The best stage managers are usually women, who bear the indignity for the historical neccessity of continuity itself." - John Osbourne

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