Author Topic: Writing a new script  (Read 420 times)

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Paul

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Writing a new script
« on: Oct 08, 2018, 06:23 am »
Hi everyone, it's me again!

I've been given a script for Sweeney Todd (my college production) however the script is set out landscape with two script pages on one page of A4 and it's double-sided. It's really bugging me as there is no way I can write down any blocking or notes or anything in the margins which are non-existent.

I've started typing up the script in MS Word but this means the page numbers I'm going to have are different to the ones of the script. What would you do in this situation? Would you use Word or is there a different program that you'd use to format the script in a way that means you can write in it?

Thank you in advance! 

KMC

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Re: Writing a new script
« Reply #1 on: Oct 08, 2018, 06:34 am »
I would use Word and force a page break in your document where there is a new page in the script.  If you're using a PC hold down alt then press i, then b. 

In practice you will have a lot of white space on each page, however your page numbers will match the group (very important for rehearsal) and you'll have plenty of space for blocking notes :)
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BenTheStageMan

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Re: Writing a new script
« Reply #2 on: Oct 08, 2018, 11:12 am »
You can also hold down Ctrl and press Enter to insert a page break.
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Michelle R. Wood

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Re: Writing a new script
« Reply #3 on: Oct 15, 2018, 02:04 pm »
I second KMC's suggestion: it's the same method I've used when keep track of changes in a script as the rehearsal process went on. Correct page numbers are not just important for actors but the entire production team, especially during tech.

Alternatively, if you don't want to type the whole thing up and have access to a photocopier, you can cut the script in pieces and write page numbers on them, then run it off on 8.5x11 paper.
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Paul

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Re: Writing a new script
« Reply #4 on: Oct 20, 2018, 08:09 am »
Hi all!

Thank you for your advice with writing a new script. I have finished writing it, 60 pages later.

With regards to putting in the same page numbers, using the page break function helps if the text finishes in the script and not in my written one. But how do you go the other way - so in the copy I wrote, the first page of the script I was given runs on one page but in the one I wrote, that same page continues over two pages. How do you stop it doing this? So that it matches up exactly. Is it a case of playing with the formatting and seeing what works best? But then I don't want to end up with a script that has a variety of fonts and font sizes.

Thank you again for your help and for your help in this as well!

Maribeth

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Re: Writing a new script
« Reply #5 on: Oct 20, 2018, 12:53 pm »
You can decrease the amount of space between lines, use a slightly smaller font, decrease your margins, or let it spill on the next page and call the next page "77A".

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