Author Topic: PROPS: Prop turkey  (Read 6513 times)

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supershorty

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PROPS: Prop turkey
« on: Oct 08, 2005, 12:26 pm »
I'm currently working on "A Christmas Carol," and we've run into a bit of a wall with our props.  The script calls for a large "prize turkey" and several small chickens.  It would be very expensive (and unsanitary) to use real ones, but we don't know where we can find realistic looking artificial ones.  Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.  Thank you!
« Last Edit: Jun 08, 2009, 11:01 pm by PSMKay »
-Katie Paige

loebtmc

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Prop dilemma
« Reply #1 on: Oct 08, 2005, 12:31 pm »
where are you - that has a lot to do w the answer - but assuming you are near Chicago or some other large city:

1) prop shops
2) a college art department can easily build them from papier mache
3) you can build from cutouts from the Hallmark store (or something like a Michael's)
4) go to the thrift shops - you'd be amazed what turns up as former centerpieces!
5) carve it from styro or crumpled tin foil

BalletPSM

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Prop dilemma
« Reply #2 on: Oct 08, 2005, 04:24 pm »
How many theatres in this country have done some version of a Christmas Carol?  Probably 90%.  I'm sure you could rent one for pretty cheap from somewhere.

Where in the US are you?  I know there are theatres here that would probably be willing to rent one to you -- unless you're planning to do this show again at some point down the line, at which point it would be more cost effective to have one made somewhere.   (see the above response -- good ideas there)
Stage managing is getting to do everything your mom told you not to do - read in the dark, sit too close to the TV, and play with the light switches!

giabow

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Prop dilemma
« Reply #3 on: Oct 08, 2005, 06:17 pm »
From experience, I can say that making small chickens out of styrofoam and paint isn't too difficult (especially if your audience is at least five feet away from the stage.

I made six cornish game hens out of styrofoam for The Nerd this past summer.  They were on plates with real food, and with stood the washing of the plates pretty well (they were glued onto the plates.)  They require a little bit of maintenance (regluing wings and legs back on,) but weren't too bad.

I haven't tried anything larger, but imagine it can't be too different.

MatthewShiner

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prize turkey
« Reply #4 on: Oct 08, 2005, 08:28 pm »
In Dallas we used a real turkey that went to a taxidermist.

(Apparently . . . a prize Turkey would not have been plucked yet in Dicken's time . . . It always freaked me out.  It only lasted three years until a new Turkey would be purchased.)
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Aerial

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Prop dilemma
« Reply #5 on: Oct 09, 2005, 11:20 am »
We do Christmas Carol every year, and the big turkey is made out of styrafoam.  Its nearly as big as the kid who carries it in.

supershorty

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Prop dilemma
« Reply #6 on: Oct 09, 2005, 12:16 pm »
Quote
Where in the US are you?


I'm in rural Illinois- I'm 2 hours from Chicago.  The only theatre in close proximity to me is summer stock, thus they have never done "A Christmas Carol."  There are no real prop shops around her, either.

 All suggestions will be forwarded to my director.  Thank you!
-Katie Paige

thesteff

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« Reply #7 on: Oct 11, 2005, 11:30 pm »
I have worked on a few different shows that required "roast bird" . . .

One of the methods we have used is (yes, this is a little scary, but it works very well) to first roast an actual bird.  Afterwards, prop it so that all grease, etc. drains away.  Then, rinse out the inside with soapy water.  Obviously you have to be careful with the outside so that you don't mar your work.  Next, fill a bucket with shellac, and dunk that baby.  Let it dry fully, then dunk it again.  Not only do you have a realistic looking turkey; it can survive a few drop-kicks as well!
Thesteff, aka Mommie Boo!

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ljh007

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Shellacked turkey
« Reply #8 on: Oct 13, 2005, 08:46 am »
A great shellacked turkey was used in one show I did and was stored backstage between performances. One night the custodial crew had themselves a feast and were all too ill to return to work for the next few days. How they even tore apart the prop is beyond me - they must have been really hungry! ... Just wanted to share the funny story.  :lol:

YesItsKat

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Prop dilemma
« Reply #9 on: Oct 17, 2005, 11:38 pm »
I live two hours from Chi too....how weird....

Didaskalos

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Prop dilemma
« Reply #10 on: Nov 24, 2005, 09:53 pm »
It's probably too late to help you for this show, but for future reference...
there are numerous companies who provide fake food for grocery stores and restaurant displays, etc.  Just do a search for "fake food" online.  You'll find quite a few of these companies.  Some of the food is expensive depending on the size and level of relaism--and some of it is amazingly realistic--but if you are going to use it perennially, it would perhaps be a worthwhile investment.
Do it right the first time;  do it right every time.

kmfishburn

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Prop dilemma
« Reply #11 on: Jan 25, 2006, 01:15 am »
A few years ago, I worked on "The Christmas Schooner" and it called for a turkey. We looked at what they had used in the past and it was a rubber turkey that was really only the size of a Cornish Hen.  So I decided to make one.  I brought the 2 kids that were in the show in one day to help me and we used styrofoam, chicken wire and paper mache. The kids had a BALL and it kept them busy and entertained once the rehearsal started (we had started doing runthroughs at that point).  Then I painted it a few days later and you really couldn't tell from the house that it wasn't real. One of the cast members even decorated the legs with the white caps.  Needless to say, the cast took great pride in that turkey...

This is DEFINATELY too late for you, but maybe it'll help someone else...  :)

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