Author Topic: BLOCKING: How to label blocking in unconventional spaces  (Read 1772 times)

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JJ Hersh

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I'm currently doing a show in a Blackbox Theater, with seating banks on two sides at a right angle to each other. I'm not sure how to notate where everything is because there are multiple parts of the stage that could be Upstage, Downstage, Stageleft, or Stageright. Does anyone know of alternative notations for Blocking in situations like this?

Maribeth

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Re: BLOCKING: How to label blocking in unconventional spaces
« Reply #1 on: Oct 27, 2015, 08:56 am »
You could use North, South, East, and West, or positions on a clock face (12 o'clock, 3 o'clock, etc). If you post signs in the rehearsal hall, everyone will know which direction is "North".

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babens

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Re: BLOCKING: How to label blocking in unconventional spaces
« Reply #2 on: Oct 27, 2015, 03:09 pm »
It's really just a matter of consistency for yourself and that you can translate the directions back to the director and cast. Posting the signs will definitely help. It's also a good idea to check with the director as to their thoughts, especially if they are the type to do any pre-blocking, and see what they are thinking, since consistency with them is also very helpful.

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BenTheStageMan

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Re: BLOCKING: How to label blocking in unconventional spaces
« Reply #3 on: Oct 27, 2015, 03:16 pm »
You could also consider the locations of the dressing rooms and the entrance of the space.  If the audience comes in from one side the space, that side of the stage could be downstage.  If the dressing rooms are behind one of the set walls, that wall can be upstage.
You could also choose where the booth is as the Downstage direction.
AND if you want to be very radical about it: the point of the playing space that is at the corner of the seating could be downstage, with the far corner upstage.

Plenty of options.  But like Maribeth said it's important that everyone be on the same page about the directions.
"Show people are doomed!  Doomed to a life of booze...and pills...and heavy meals late at night!" -Judy, "Ruthless!"

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