Author Topic: on the other end of the headset spectrum  (Read 17225 times)

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wade

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #30 on: Feb 22, 2006, 11:47 pm »
Just be careful because that would, I think, block a radio frequencies, and so if you use wifi from an outside the building AP your staff wouldn’t get that signal, just as an example
What I’m getting at is that the dissension would need to be made about what type of house you are and what problems would be created just by my solving of one problem I could live with

Mac Calder

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #31 on: Feb 23, 2006, 12:57 am »
Most theatres are fairly self contained, and will rarely need wi-fi within the space. If they really need access to the network, a cabled connection would be better anyway.

Cat

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #32 on: Feb 27, 2006, 12:10 am »
ClearCom

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wade

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« Reply #33 on: Mar 07, 2006, 10:38 am »
one of the other reasons for not blocking all signals is emergency signals, such as police medical and fire. many doctors will come to a show being on call, and need to get a call for emergency basis only.

one solution to this is a new paint. it has special micro wire in it so that it blocks wireless signal, it receives "power" from a copper wire and it can be turned on and off. it can also be selective to allow emergencies signals in as well as wi-fi or any signal you want.

i will post a web site soon

Mac Calder

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #34 on: Mar 07, 2006, 02:30 pm »
Quote from: "wade"
one of the other reasons for not blocking all signals is emergency signals, such as police medical and fire. many doctors will come to a show being on call, and need to get a call for emergency basis only.


I am sorry, but the NO MOBILES policy is BLANKET. NO MOBILES. Standard Operating Procedure is as follows: Doctor is on call - they are to tell the FOH staff upon entering the building. Doctor does one of two things - gives mobile to FOH staff or has emergency calls diverted to the theatre phone. Doctors seating is arranged to be on the isle side and the location noted by the phone. In the event of an emergancy a member of the FOH team retrieves the doctor without interuption to the performance. Most doctors I have seen are fairly good about it, they come up of their own violition and 'register' themselves with FOH.

I don't know if you have ever routinely worked with cans in a location where people are talking on mobile phones, but it is not fun. Especially when you are listening to 4 channels of it with the volume turned up because there is a lot of stage noise.

wade

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« Reply #35 on: Mar 17, 2006, 05:02 pm »
were you in a wierd or wierless system

the only thing that cell phones affect is the speaker in the headset. and thats only the radiation from that cell phone checking in and then the phone would have to be within a coulple of feet of a beltpack.
which is why we have a all cell fones off for all orduction crew

however the rf from a cell phone dosenot in any way interfier with wierless micks sine the wierless mic range is so high.

Mac Calder

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on the other end of the headset spectrum
« Reply #36 on: Mar 17, 2006, 07:12 pm »
Even if you cut the cans out of the equation, a blanket off policy ensures that the temptation to answer phones is no longer there. And just as a BTW: the way we tested was to place a phone about 2 meters from one of the cans cables, and we still received interferance from it. If the cans cables were balanced audio, it would not matter in the slightest.

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