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Unless requested otherwise I'll give the entire cast double sided. I'll always accommodate a request for single sided, but I don't want to go through all that paper unless necessary.
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Students and Novice Stage Managers / Re: Learning how to read music
« Last post by DiploMattOnline on Dec 16, 2018, 03:07 pm »
As everyone has said, the best way to learn how to read music is by learning an instrument.

When you're part of a production that has music involved, a copy of the score/sheet music should be available. If you don't really know how to read music, try and get the copy with Vocals. 99% of the time, there will be lyrics below the top line (Treble) of music.
Each mark on the page has a meaning. There are various different notes etc. The easiest way to learn what each note (sound) on the page makes is by learning your scales and the musical alphabet which only contains 8 letters (A B C D E F G). For example: the Treble clef (looks similar to an '&') each line and space has its own Letter. Starting from the bottom line of the stave, the lines have a letter associated to them. The lines are E G B D F. The best way to remember this is Elephants Go Bonkers Drinking Fanta. The letters of the spaces are F A C E.

Music theory is something that will take you a long time to get your head around. You should be able to find various tutorials on YouTube. This one is very basic but it should get you started in understanding what notes are what. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leIpJWeWYfA
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Stage Management: Plays & Musicals / Re: STAGING: Realistic CPR
« Last post by DiploMattOnline on Dec 16, 2018, 02:25 pm »
They may still choose to do the breathing since it's more "realistic," but the past two times I got my CPR certification the instructor told us breaths are no longer considered necessary. Whoever the People In Charge are, they have decided that people had too many CPR steps to remember and took too long to get to the part that matters. All they recommend you do now is check if the person is conscious and/or breathing, and start compressions as soon as you can.

I have to disagree with this. As a former EMT, breaths are still given, however, if you're not comfortable performing mouth to mouth, you don't have to. The reason for this is that the heart stores - on average - 5 minutes of oxygen within the system. If you don't provide rescue breaths, their chance of survival drops (NOT DRAMATICALLY) but it drops. I would suggest carrying a mouth guard. You can get them off amazon for pennies.

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Quote
I've always been taught that you should write your cues on the page relating to your writing hand. E.G. I'm right-handed, therefore, I write my cues on the right.

I have tried writing them on the left, however, I find it difficult to line up the cue with the line/direction on the script.

I use removable stickers a lot of the time, in my left margin of my left page. I then use a straight edge (often a lighting template, or drafting triangle) to draw a straight line to the cue word. What I can't do is have the cue on one page and then a line over/through the rings to the script page, which I've seen some people do. That doesn't work for me. I also tend to adapt my script every production and continue to finesse what works for me, so yes, to each his/her own.
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I've always been taught that you should write your cues on the page relating to your writing hand. E.G. I'm right-handed, therefore, I write my cues on the right.

I have tried writing them on the left, however, I find it difficult to line up the cue with the line/direction on the script.

I guess it's just personal preference.
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The Green Room / Studying
« Last post by DiploMattOnline on Dec 16, 2018, 01:16 pm »
Hey Guys,

I've had loads of experience as a Theatre Tech in various roles, however, I haven't had any formal training.

I am gonna be applying to different colleges when applications open, however, do you know anywhere online that I could get some formal/in-formal training?

I've tried googling but not got very much, it's just directing me to college websites to sign up for their closed courses.

Any help would be much appreciated.

Thanks,

Matt
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Uploaded Forms / Re: Spike Matrix
« Last post by Maribeth on Dec 15, 2018, 08:54 pm »
I'm not Marcie but might be able to answer your question. You can use it to recreate your spikes in any space you're in. So you can make your spike matrix (or spike chart or spike list) in the rehearsal room- in this case it's measured from down center, so you measure how far upstage your spike is, and then how far SL or SR. Then when you move to stage, you can re-spike exactly the same as you had in the rehearsal hall. Or, if it's a touring show, you can recreate your spikes quickly and efficiently in every venue.

The other way I've seen it done is by triangulation. You put a screw into the floor on the plaster line 10' SR of center and 10' SL of center. Hook a tape measure onto each screw and measure out your spikes where the tape measures meet. You'll end up with two measurements per spike, a SL and a SR measurement. Do the same wherever you're taping out. It's fast and exact, and doesn't need anyone to hold onto the other end of each tape measure.
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Uploaded Forms / Re: spike Matrix
« Last post by DiploMattOnline on Dec 15, 2018, 02:42 pm »
Hey MarcieA,

I've never seen a Spike Matrix before now. How would you use it? Would you create the staging space in the rehearsal room (Mark out the size of the stage etc.) then measure how far in each spike is?

Thanks,

Matthew
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Looking for:

Mamma Mia
Anyone Can Whistle
Annie

Thanks :)
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Tools of the Trade / Re: Dressing Room Mirror Lights
« Last post by KMC on Dec 10, 2018, 07:55 am »
This is great information.  The Lighting Supervisor is getting some LED lights with an acceptable CRI and color temp at one station and then get some feedback before changing other stations.   Thank you for the help!

Please do let us know how it turns out! 
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