Author Topic: resume format  (Read 50616 times)

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KMC

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Re: resume format
« Reply #30 on: Mar 25, 2007, 05:49 pm »
I would rather see 5 stage management credits with some details about the shows than see 25 credits that simply have show name, director, and theatre.  Put what makes you qualified for the job you're seeking right there in plain view. 

I can't disagree more.  If you send a CV style resume, it looks like you are trying to fluff your history.  If I know the theatres/directors names/KIND of theatre/show name, I know what you do.   If I need details, I'll call your references. 



Like I said, I'm sure people will disagree! 
Get action. Do things; be sane; donít fritter away your time; create, act, take a place wherever you are and be somebody; get action. -T. Roosevelt

MatthewShiner

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Re: resume format
« Reply #31 on: Mar 25, 2007, 07:01 pm »
My vote is that there is a lot to be said about sticking to the professional resume format.  Any deviations from the norm doesn't usually bode well.

I think the cover letter might be a better place to state things like your work with automation, large cast sizes, etc.  Or if you have a special skills section, maybe there.


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Anything posted here as in my own personal opinion, and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of my employer - whomever they be at a given moment in time.

melissalee

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Re: resume format
« Reply #32 on: Apr 08, 2007, 11:57 pm »
I am doing the 'resume re-vamp' thing right now, leaving a 4yr residence PSM position and now breaking free for the freelance! world.
Having been in a residence position for several years, I have re-worked my resume numerious times, ending up  listing jobs by company rather than show title. I found it way too cluttered to list each individual show I worked on,   having done (7) shows each season for 4 years. However, there were people I worked with; new playwrights and directors, that I want to name drop on my resume without taking up four pages.( you never know who will call an 'old friend' that worked with you that once and ask a casual question about  you)
I listed my residence position first with 'see attached' at the end, and then listed SHOW, DIRECTOR/DESIGNER. DATE (if I thought designer might be a name to help get me a job- build good relationships everywhere! you never know),  as part of that seperate page. I feel it is good to list the specific shows you have worked on, and drop the names of anyone you worked with that might be known and might be able to help you get hired, not just the dates working in residence somewhere. It is good for future employeers to know what kind of shows  you have done before.

KimSM

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Re: resume format
« Reply #33 on: Jan 21, 2008, 06:02 pm »
Those of you who don't think putting the year you worked a job is good or standard industry practice, would you recommend taking the year off one's resume if one has it formatted that way?

ljh007

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Re: resume format
« Reply #34 on: Jan 21, 2008, 06:37 pm »
The question of whether to include the year or not simply comes down to the information you choose to communicate.

If you include years on your resume, you can demonstrate some positive things:
- you've worked professional shows for several years; you're serious about this being a theatre professional.
- you've worked consistently (several shows a year, with little "down time" between shows); you can and do make your living this way.
- you were a resident with a company for several seasons; you are reliable, and people generally don't mind being with you for months at a time.

Dates can share neutral info, and you should be ready to speak to any of these points:
- you have worked musicals (for example) in the past, but not in many years;
- you have taken a bit of a break from the theatre business, either currently or at some point; or
- you don't work often - only a handful of shows every few years.

Or dates can communicate not-so-good information:
- you're either very young or very old (shouldn't be a hiring consideration, I know, but protect yourself if you think this info could make someone think a certain way about you or your ability);
- you're fresh out of school with very little professional/non-academic shows under your belt;
- you only do 1 show or less a year;
- you had to leave a show, or you tend to over-commit yourself (if you show months, or it's clear you have more shows in 1 year than any mortal could handle).

So think about how someone who doesn't know you might look at your resume, and imagine any judgments - positive or negative - they might make about you from what they read on your resume page. You want your resume to be 100% truthful, while presenting your skills and experience in the best possible way. For some individuals, it might be very strong to present dates; For others, it might be very damaging. In some other cases, it simply might just not look well on the page (the aesthetic of a neat, clean page counts for a lot, so cut where you can!). Do what is ultimately best for you.

greentheatre

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Re: resume format
« Reply #35 on: Apr 08, 2008, 12:07 am »
This has been a very helpful thread for me!

Here's my questions:

1. What if you are a hypenate? Actor-Stage Manager-Director-Stagehand

2. I'm AEA, primarily work as an actor, but also stage manage, direct, work as an I.A.T.S.E. Stagehand, have worked behind the scenes on films, TV and Radio and I'm an Artistic Director for a Small Professional Theatre company and have been at it all since High School in 1982. I love all aspects of theatre and film.

3. Do I hurt my chances if I follow my Stage Manager credits with other production credits?

Rik Deskin
Stage Manager
Rik Deskin
Stage Manager

Artistic Director
Eclectic Theater Company

ljh007

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Re: resume format
« Reply #36 on: Apr 10, 2008, 08:50 am »
Hi Rik!

To answer your questions in general, I would recommend you have a resume tailored to the specific job you are going for at any particular time. If you're going for film, have a film resume; actor - list your acting credits; stage manager - highlight your SM experience. It's practically impossible for one all-purpose resume to be effective across these many fields. As far as the hyphenation goes, I wouldn't list all the titles, except perhaps on a business card or something. For a resume, title it with the job you are currently applying for. Or do something generic (though admittedly less exciting) like "Theatre Professional".

I don't think it is necessarily damaging at all to show your wide range of experience; on the contrary, I think it would be impressive to a hirer and your versatility probably helps significantly on each job. But keep your resume targeted and concise. This will keep your entry at the top of the pile, instead of diluting its effectiveness by trying to show everything at once. You can elaborate in a very effective and impressive way through your cover letter and interview.

MatthewShiner

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Re: resume format
« Reply #37 on: Apr 10, 2008, 09:40 am »
I second about customizing your resume for the job.

I would be careful as you move up the ranks for putting too much on a specific resume.

Although on some levels, having a stage manager who has done a lot of other stuff on the side is good, there comes a point when you want a stage manager who is specializing in stage management, and just a jack of all trades.


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Anything posted here as in my own personal opinion, and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of my employer - whomever they be at a given moment in time.

BethanyP

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Re: resume format
« Reply #38 on: Jul 12, 2008, 01:42 am »
I just graduated High school and am looking to change my resume from one oriented to colleges to one for the professional world ((now that I've taken care of getting accepted to a theatre program.)) My main concern is how to catagorize my experience. I have several school productions and concerts to list as educational experience, but our theatre was often rented out and I worked on deck crew or spotlight for many of those, and i'm not sure how to catagorize them (Some were paid, some unpaid.) I've also had two paying gigs since I graduated, one as an SM ((and completely unconnected with school)) and one as a camera operator at my high school's theatre. What would you recommend I use as my headings?
"We can do no great things, only small things with great love." -M.T.

ljh007

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Re: resume format
« Reply #39 on: Jul 24, 2008, 07:59 pm »
Hi Bethany -

Welcome to SMNetwork!

After reading your post, I might suggest you do not categorize your show experience at all. Just list the shows you've worked. If you're listing producing companies, it will be clear that some are for school and others are for companies. At this point in your career, it might not matter (from a hiring standpoint) which shows were paid vs. unpaid. Just show them what you've done, what you know, and what you can do!

BethanyP

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Re: resume format
« Reply #40 on: Jul 25, 2008, 12:22 am »
Okay. Thanks
"We can do no great things, only small things with great love." -M.T.

Josh Parkin-Ring

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Re: resume format
« Reply #41 on: Apr 20, 2009, 06:48 am »
Mine is...

Production   Director/Principle   Producing Company    Location    Date

I have found that in interviews thr Production Managers ask who produced the production and that shows the level of my experience.  Does anyone else have the same feelings?

~Josh
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PSMKay

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Re: resume format
« Reply #42 on: Apr 20, 2009, 10:00 pm »
Mine is...

Production   Director/Principle   Producing Company    Location    Date

I have found that in interviews thr Production Managers ask who produced the production and that shows the level of my experience.  Does anyone else have the same feelings?

~Josh


Sidenote - Josh, you may want to spellcheck that w. a dictionary.  A Principle is a moral tenet or guiding rule.  A Principal is a person in a central position.  An easy mix-up, but not one for the resume.

Josh Parkin-Ring

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Re: resume format
« Reply #43 on: Apr 21, 2009, 03:11 am »


Sidenote - Josh, you may want to spellcheck that w. a dictionary.  A Principle is a moral tenet or guiding rule.  A Principal is a person in a central position.  An easy mix-up, but not one for the resume.

PSMKAY:
Thanks...  didn't realize the mix up until you pointed it out...  Yes it should have been Principal.  Thanks!
~Josh
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MatthewShiner

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Re: resume format
« Reply #44 on: Apr 21, 2009, 12:27 pm »
I think dates are a bad idea on the resume - I can't think of any good reason to put the date on the show, unless you did the same show multiple times (Christmas Carol 02, 04, 06), otherwise it can be use to age you - either good or bad . . . I have seen very strong resumes with years on it, and I start doing the math and realize they have only been working for about three years, and I tend to look at their resume different. 

Just my two cents.
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Anything posted here as in my own personal opinion, and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of my employer - whomever they be at a given moment in time.

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