Author Topic: Follow Up Thank-You Letters  (Read 7354 times)

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smsam

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Follow Up Thank-You Letters
« on: Jan 19, 2007, 05:04 pm »
Hi All,

Just wondering if anyone could help me. Normally after I receive payment for a job thats the end of it. Sometimes I send a friendly email or a drop a telephone to admin to say thank-you for prompt payment and I hope to work with you again soon, depending on how well I know the company, but I've never done anything formal. Well now I have had some nice new corporate stationary made up (letter-heads and buis cards etc.) and I think this is quite a good opportunity to show it off and start putting my new "corperate identity out there" as my marketing friend would say!

So basically I'm looking as part of my invoicing process to now send a little follow-up letter saying thank you the payment has been received and I hope we work together again in the future. The only problem is I can't draft this letter at all!! Everything I write just sounds quite awkward and generally rubbish!

Any help much appreciated! Thanks!

Sam x   
Sam x

Mac Calder

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Re: Follow Up Thank-You Letters
« Reply #1 on: Jan 19, 2007, 07:21 pm »
I would try and keep it short and simple - if you have any smallish 'index' cards or 'letterhead slips' - they are an ideal size.

I would use something along the lines of

Quote

To ________

I would just like to take a moment to thank you for your prompt payment upon completion of <the job name>. It was a pleasure to work with both you and your team, and I hope to work with you again in the future should an opportunity present itself.

You and your team are a credit to the industry, and until we meet again, I wish you the best of luck in all future endeavors.

Kindest Regards

Your Name Here

I would avoid making it a form letter - write an outline maybe, but don't make it too obvious that you filled in the blanks.

LiLz

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Re: Follow Up Thank-You Letters
« Reply #2 on: Jan 19, 2007, 11:16 pm »
I agree with Mac - keep it short, professional, and sweet.  However, if something memorable happened or a special bond was created, don't be afraid to mention it.  If there's something brief you can say that will help position you in their minds, that will help them remember the show and, therefore, you, go for it. 

ljh007

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Re: Follow Up Thank-You Letters
« Reply #3 on: Jan 20, 2007, 09:45 am »
You should definitely also include your updated resume, prominently calling attention to any new and upcoming engagements, in these letters. It goes the extra mile to complete the self-promotion package and show that you are busy and always taking on new projects. You don't need to go on and on about your resume - that's tacky and insincere when couched in a thank-you note like this. In fact, you might not mention it at all in the note, but just enclose it in the envelope.

But second, there's something in your post that seems a little odd to me. Are companies mailing payment after the show closes? In every professional show I've ever done, I walk out the door after load-out with a check in my hand. When someone says "I'll mail it to you" I say "No, I'll take it now, thanks." Because otherwise, I never get a check. It is entirely standard to receive your full payment immediately upon closing the show. I do understand that sometimes smaller theatres say they'll mail checks; they've tried to say it to me. But it's always, always in my contract that I am paid in full when I walk out the door for the last time. I don't mean to be a Cassandra, but I would really encourage you to take up this practice, because if you haven't been burned yet, you will be one day.

smsam

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Re: Follow Up Thank-You Letters
« Reply #4 on: Jan 20, 2007, 02:22 pm »
Hi Guys,

Thanks for the help! Think I'm in a better writing mood today so I will have a go at redrafting the letter!

In response to ljh007, when I receive payment depends on the type of show! Most of the work I do at the moment, due to other commitments, are short (anywhere from one day to two weeks) gigs which involve either just Show Calling for Showcases/ Festivals/ Corporate Events or props buying for theatre productions. This means that I'm "self employed" (i.e. I'm freelance) and I normally invoice after and receive payment withing a set amount of days (sometimes up to 30!). If it's a three week gig then I might invoice after each week depending on cash-flow and the arrangement with the company! If however its a long-running show or a permanent position (at a producing house for example) then I would be an employee (through the PAYE scheme in the UK) and I would be paid weekly/ monthly by the company on my set wage. These are the standard ways of working/ invoicing in the UK...

Sam x
Sam x

Balletdork

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Re: Follow Up Thank-You Letters
« Reply #5 on: Jan 25, 2007, 05:02 pm »
As an employer I appericiate the follow up Thank you letter- it definately puts people on the top of my list to re-hire as it indicates that they are truely interested in working with the organization in the future.  ;D

MileHighSM

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Re: Follow Up Thank-You Letters
« Reply #6 on: Jan 30, 2007, 10:40 pm »
I agree with folks-I think thank you notes are very appropriate if they are short and sweet.  Re-affirms to the employer that you valued them hiring you, etc.

BalletPSM

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Re: Follow Up Thank-You Letters
« Reply #7 on: Feb 01, 2007, 10:10 am »
How about a "thank you song"?  A composer I worked with last season apparently was so impressed that I took such great pains to contact him and negotiate royalties with him (in the dance world, sometimes people just tend to "ignore" the fact that this is the legal way to go about things!)  that at the end of our run after I had sent him his royalties check, he emailed me an iTunes song as a thank you (bonus:  It was so thoughtful, he chose a song that was actually my name)

At first I thought it was a little strange, but then I thought, "well how appropriate for a composer to do something like that!"  Then, when we decided to do the ballet again this season, it was so easy to work with him because I knew how much he appreciated our company/me. 

(BalletDork:  watch out!  you too could receive an iTunes song in your inbox if you are nice to Mr. W!)

Stage managing is getting to do everything your mom told you not to do - read in the dark, sit too close to the TV, and play with the light switches!

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Balletdork

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Re: Follow Up Thank-You Letters
« Reply #8 on: Feb 01, 2007, 12:47 pm »
I really adore this story!  ;D

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